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Author Topic: papercrete  (Read 5355 times)

Offline samatm

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papercrete
« on: July 08, 2008, 03:01:41 PM »
Hi guys and gals,

 I have been very interested in using papercrete, a mixture of rubbish paper and portland cement  formed into blocks,  ever since I saw  the flimsy (and expensive ) blocks formed for my Asawas family home built 3 years ago.   From my readings on the subject it looks like papercrete might be cheaper, cooler, and better for the environment...however I believe that the formation and curing of the blocks would have to be done in the dry season for obvious reasons

Have any of you all more seriously studied this alternative?   Take a look a the link below and search other sites on the use of papercrete and let me know what you think about its applicability in the PHILS.

http://www.livinginpaper.com/

cheers,
scott

Offline BenK

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Re: papercete
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2008, 04:54:52 PM »
That\'s interesting. The only thing that looks like an issue is that your walls would be 2 or 3 times as thick as you would ordinarily have with regular concrete, and the blocks are not as tall, so you\'d use more of them -- I would wonder if the savings in the amount of cement you\'d have to buy would be that great. And here, unlike in the U.S., I would expect that most sources of scrap paper would expect you to pay for it.
That\'s not chicken.

Offline graham

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Re: papercete
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2008, 05:37:02 PM »
Ben n Scott,

Just a thought about alternative building materials, I remember reading something about mud bricks. I believe the \"Pueblo Indians\" used this, or maybe they just \"plastered\" the outside of their dwellings??? I presume there would be rain where they built, just like here. Also, we have people in Australia doing that. Would that be plausible here??

Graham

Offline BenK

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Re: papercete
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2008, 07:56:46 PM »
For that matter, I remember an extensive discussion of using bagged rice husks as a basis for wall-building material, but I\'ll be dogged if I can find it now, somebody help me out. I remember thinking that sounded pretty sensible.
That\'s not chicken.

Offline BenK

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Re: papercete
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2008, 07:58:27 PM »
That\'s not chicken.

Offline coutts00

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Re: papercete
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2008, 11:23:42 PM »
Ben n Scott,

Just a thought about alternative building materials, I remember reading something about mud bricks. I believe the \"Pueblo Indians\" used this, or maybe they just \"plastered\" the outside of their dwellings??? I presume there would be rain where they built, just like here. Also, we have people in Australia doing that. Would that be plausible here??

Graham

Graham,

One of the advantages the North American Indians had was the high clay content of the mud and the use of dry straw to add to the bricks. Here, nothing dries out completely. Also consider the amount of rain in Northern America and Australia compared to here and the fact that typhoons will take anything not nailed down.
Wayne ;D ;D

Offline samatm

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Re: papercete
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2008, 12:03:03 AM »

yes
I too was wondering also if scap paper can be found at a loooooooooow prices in the Phils....  IF not  Perhaps rice husks and cane husks could be shredded, mixed with concrete, and formulated into durable concrete  blocks. If you read the articles and webpages on Papercrete you will see how it can be affordably mixed and formed into block sizes that fit your needs.  I think some have even formed dry walls to be erected.  I also saw in the web pages an example of a domed home made from papercrete.

Beatle

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2008, 04:45:14 AM »


 I read in a book were the Egyptians had their slaves make blocks from mud and used straw as a binder, like we use rebar. I wounder if a person built a home from mud blocks w/ straw , made it in the shape of a dome ( to deflect the wind ) and put it on stilts, would it make it through a typhoon. and also cover it with a thick plastic to keep the blocks from getting wet. Do you think the locals would live in one or shon it? It could also be covered with nipa for looks.

 Ray

Offline coutts00

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2008, 05:26:29 AM »
Its safer sitting on the ground instead of on stilts, and you would need some big stilts to support a 20 tonne slab.
Wayne ;D ;D

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2008, 06:11:35 AM »
Besides the obvious technical challenges, IMHO the locals would wonder why anyone would want to live in such an ugly house.  :)

Wayne, lead him to your dome house thread. I can\'t find it. I think he might find that thread very interesting.
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

Offline aerosick

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2008, 06:43:27 AM »
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2008, 07:48:10 AM »
Besides the obvious technical challenges, IMHO the locals would wonder why anyone would want to live in such an ugly house.  :)

Wayne, lead him to your dome house thread. I can\'t find it. I think he might find that thread very interesting.


This is the link to Dome Housing:

http://livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?topic=686.0

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2008, 08:43:42 AM »
Is this it?

http://livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?topic=693.msg3674#msg3674

Billy


Nope, the one Keith noted is the one I was thinking about.

Scott, read the link Keith posted. You\'ll get a headache probably, coz it gives a lot of details about Dome Housing, where it\'s worked and why and some of the downsides to them. Very interesting thread. Maybe you can incorporate your papercrete concept into one of these homes. Would be interesting to see one.

Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

Offline samatm

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2008, 11:05:47 AM »
yups i hv browsed the dome housing thread...very interesting but off topic lol. I think just incorporating papercrete or canecrete or tahobcrete would be as radical paradigme shift i would venture ;D.  Seriously though I will mix some test batches and make a few blocks in the backyard and keep ya\'ll informed how it goes.  How much is a bag of portland now? I think reducing by 1/2 could substancially reduce the cost of housing.. and provide cooler structure...

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Re: papercrete
« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2008, 12:11:43 PM »
yups i hv browsed the dome housing thread...very interesting but off topic lol. I think just incorporating papercrete or canecrete or tahobcrete would be as radical paradigme shift i would venture ;D.  Seriously though I will mix some test batches and make a few blocks in the backyard and keep ya\'ll informed how it goes.  How much is a bag of portland now? I think reducing by 1/2 could substancially reduce the cost of housing.. and provide cooler structure...

Scott,

We will await your test reports with interest ;D